Where land meets sea

The last few weeks have been hard and blogging has been far from my mind. But I wanted to share this slideshow, which I made for a talk I gave in the summer at the Shed Gallery’s ‘Muse’ exhibition in Lyme Regis. It features a few of my own pictures, but mostly inspirational images by other photographers that I selected from the Gallery, on the theme of my talk, coastal photography. Being a very proud Mummy, I must add that my favourite thing about it is the music, an original score composed and recorded for the talk by my very talented daughter, Maggie Talibart. Not too shabby for thirteen!

Spectra over London

London

Spectra, by Rioji Ikeda, is one of several art installations in London at present to commemorate the centenary of the start of WW1.   Certainly an imposing sight.  You don’t have to go into London to see it as it is visible for many miles around.  However, if you do want to see it for yourself, you will have to be quick – tonight’s the last night.

Spectra 1 (moonless)

Two lights in one day

infra red and mist

One day last month, I managed to get out to Chatley Heath during some early morning mist.  The forest of towering scots pines looked spooky in the mist so I gave this image an infrared style treatment.  By the early afternoon, the mist had burned off and colour returned.

Chatley Heath

I love going back to familiar locations and discovering how their mood changes with the season and the light.

Fields of gold

rapeseed field
Fields of oilseed rape are in full bloom right now.
rapeseed field
Oilseed rape is not a subtle crop. Each Spring it blazes out its presence in the English countryside, briefly turning this ‘green and pleasant land’ into something far more extroverted.
rapeseed field
I took the opportunity to capture some of its moods twice last week, near Wisley in Surrey and the village of Northchapel in West Sussex. It was interesting how the colour changed with the light, from acid yellow to something far more mellow, with a hint of amber.
rapeseed field

The farmer of this field has sown his crop right over one of the many public rights of way that criss-cross the meadows here.

rapeseed field

What footpath?


If you are not a fan of swathes of yellow in the countryside, you might be interested in this news item from last year, although after seeing the artist’s impression of how the future of oilseed rape farming could appear, you might feel that yellow is not so bad!
rapeseed field

Landscapes by Women

Australia
I am delighted to have been accepted into Landscapes by Women, a collective of inspiring photographers with a growing presence in the industry.  My fellow members not only have strong portfolios but they also educate, lead tours, inspire through lectures and contribute images and text to prestigious publications here in the UK and beyond.  I am honoured to be in their company.
East Sussex
By why Landscapes by Women?  In this emancipated age, do we really need a group specifically for women?  Landscape photography is a male dominated field. There may be purely practical reasons for this.  Issues of personal safety complicate being out alone with expensive kit in remote locations and low light.  Although there are many exceptions, generally women take the larger role in raising children.  It can be hard to chase the best light when tea has to be made, homework supervised, bedtime stories read.   I can’t count the number of times I have watched beautiful light through the window while cooking dinner.   Chatley Heath
I hasten to add that I wouldn’t have it any other way.  I feel privileged to be a mum and consider it the best and most important job I will ever have.   But you can see why landscape photography might favour the men.
British Columbia
However, there are more female landscape photographers now than ever before. Landscapes by Women celebrates that fact and aims to ‘show that regardless of any challenges women face, we can bring unique and compelling images’. I would love it if you had time to visit the website and see for yourself.  You can also find us on Facebook.

The wonderful Wey

Weybridge

Two more shots from my stroll along my local stretch of the Wey Navigation in Weybridge.  The top one is a panorama, stitched from five separate vertical images to make a big 11000 by 7000 (approx) pixel file, which will make a mighty print, if I ever print it.  The lower image is the same viewpoint as my moonrise shot last month.

Weybridge

 

I am now writing for a local website once a week and the second shot featured in my article last week.