365 Backlog

derelict hut

365/60

Starting to catch up with my backlog of 365 redux images before a different sort of post tomorrow. 365/60 is from 2010, 61and 62 are from 2009 and 63 is from 2014.  365/64 is also from last year.  According to the traditional song, seven magpies is ‘for a secret never to be told’, but what about 24?  Finally, 365/65 is also from 2014, an image hitherto unprocessed from my day out shooting street images with Damian Demolder and Amateur Photographer magazine.  If you want to know more about my 365 redux project, see here.

wey navigation

365/61

poinsettia

365/62

snowdrops

365/63

magpies

365/64

street

365/65

Curlicue

Norfolk

Just before I started photographing the seals featured here a couple of days ago, I couldn’t resist capturing a few frames of the gentle dawn light.  As before, this is Horsey beach in Norfolk. A two-second exposure captured the shapes made by the surf.

I have been promising a post about shutter speeds and waves. It is still in the pipeline but it’s been busy week! This afternoon alone I have fielded three enquiries for images, all expecting me to provide them without charge in return for the ‘honour’ of attributing my picture to me. I know, the internet is full of photographers whinging about being asked to give images free. I do try to remain stoical, but I must admit it is a little irritating sometimes.

* * * * *

On a lighter note, here are some more 365 images.  365/54 is from 2009.  I was walking with one of my greatest friends on Puttenham Common.  The light was very ordinary but I snapped a shot and had a go at improving it in editing. It was useful experience at least and, in accordance with my 365 redux pledge, I have re-edited before sharing it again now.  I chose it because it seems to be the only picture I have taken on 23rd February in any year since 2009 and because, coincidentally, I was out walking with the very same friend again on 23rd Feb this week.  One of the interesting and unexpected things about this project so far has been finding connections and coincidences across the years.

Surrey landscape

365/54

365/55 and 56 are from 2014.  55 is another watery local landscape during the flooding of winter 2014. 56 is Farncombe Boathouse on the River Wey Navigation near Godalming.

Surrey

365/55

Surrey landscape

365/66

Snow, reflections and the English winter

Surrey landscape

f/7.1, 1/40, 35mm, ISO 400

Another shot from yesterday’s foray into the snowy landscape.  The snow is gone now; it doesn’t last long here.  Back to grey and wet today, but it was fun while it lasted.  Looking back to this day last year for my 365 redux project, I found images of golden light and blue skies.  This little island is known for its variable climate; discussing the weather is practically a national sport.  Last year we had one of the wettest winters since records began and nary a single flake of snow.

reflections in canal

365/35

 

The morning that just keeps giving

Wey Navigation

I am still going through my files from Friday’s epic dawn shoot. I have enough to keep me going for quite a while. I hope this top one conveys something of the post-dawn tranquility I experienced on the banks of the Wey Navigation between Newark and Ripley.

Surrey landscape

This second image was actually taken much later in the same day, nearer to sunset. The frost was mostly gone but there was a subtle hint of mist in the distance. I was attracted to the way the grass was catching the light; the crow on the fence was the icing on the cake. I just had time for one exposure before it flew away.

By complete contrast, my 365/26 is from this day in 2009. I had gone into Guildford with a friend, to do some shopping. My camera was an encumbrance I could have done without but the demands of 365 made me bring it, albeit reluctantly. I snapped these tulips, and it really is a snap. But, when I shared it on Flickr, it caught Getty’s eye and became one of the first images in my stock portfolio.

flowers

365/26

As I promised only to post images never before shared, or to re-edit old ones, I have added a light vignette to this and some extra clarity. Cheating? Maybe, but it’s the only file I could find!

 

 

Deer in frost

wey navigation

Another picture from Friday’s fantastic, frosty day out.  As I was taking a landscape shot,  two deer took flight across the meadow.  Of course, my wide lens hadn’t a hope of catching them, but I quickly changed to my 70-200mm lens and hoped I’d find more.  Luckily, I did.

wey navigation

Yesterday, I shared the colour version of this shot, also from Friday but I rather like this tinted black and white edit too.   And it is a handy segue from frost to black and white to my 365/25, from this day in 2009:

car

365/25

 

Perfect morning

Surrey landscape

Yesterday morning, I had a chance to capture dawn over Newark Priory. It’s a shot I’d had in my mind for about 5 years and the conditions were perfect. For more about Newark Priory, see here.

Afterwards, I pottered about on the Wey Navigation towpath and collected some wintery shots.  I am writing a book about the Navigation and these shots should fit nicely. Altogether, a successful morning’s shooting.

Wey Navigation

Wey Navigation

365/23

My 365/23 is from last year.  Three modes of transport, four if feet count (there’s a pedestrian on the footbridge).  Taken at the junction of the Wey Navigation and the Basingstoke Canal. For a fuller post about this shoot and the history of this location, click here.

Surrey landscape

365/24

365/24 is from 2010, a brief moment of good light at the end of what had been a grey, uninspiring day.  This is the Millennium Glasshouse at RHS Wisley.

Echoes of times past

reflections

365/8

Today’s 365 is from 2009.  It’s quite handy that I did a project 365 in 2009, as there are images from every day; helpful when I find that I didn’t shoot on that particular date in any other year I have on file.  But still, I have to come up with a new image, or a re-edit at least.  Some days when I did my first 365, I struggled to find one image worth downloading.  Luckily, on 8th January I went for a stroll along my local waterway, the Wey Navigation, and took several pictures. Here’s one I hadn’t processed until now.  It is a fitting image to choose in the context of a project that involves revisiting the past; the building reflected in this picture is a modern apartment block built as a pastiche to echo the Victorian mill that used to stand here.   The original building could not be renovated as it burned down in 1963, in the last of many fires on this site (the perils of milling seed oil).

Epic light and changeable weather

Wey Navigation
The last couple of days have been really foul here – loads more rain that our already saturated landscape really didn’t need, and unremitting grey skies. But on Tuesday, as the weather front rolled slowly in over the Surrey countryside, Jen and I were treated to some seriously epic skies.
Surrey landscape
Fortuitously, we had chosen for our weekly photoshoot the Wey Navigation towpath between Cartbridge and Triggs Lock. The Navigation is bounded here by water meadows, open spaces and big skies. We were like the proverbial children in the sweet shop (kids in a candy store in American!). It will take me a while to get through all the images I made but here are the first few out of the digital darkroom. Little editing required thanks to my circ. polariser and ND grad. filters. Colours as they appeared on the day.
Weather front

Of barges, trains and automobiles

Railway in Surrey
Recently I have started to retrace my steps along the Wey Navigation towpath with a view to getting some more up to date pictures for a possible book project.  Most of the Navigation runs through pretty countryside but there is one spot, between New Haw and Pyrford, where it runs close to, and is indeed crossed by, the M25, Britain’s busiest motorway.  It is not the most picturesque of landscapes but still full of interest for the photographer.  I enjoy the challenge of trying to make images here.
The M25 crosses the Wey
Although not conventionally beautiful, this is a very significant spot in the history of transport.  Here, within a few paces of its passage under the motorway, the Wey Navigation meets the Basingstoke Canal. The Navigation is not a canal strictly speaking but a river made navigable, and it predates the canal age by some hundred years.  Thus the Basingstoke Canal (opened in 1793) represents a later evolution of British transport, although it was never as successful as the Navigation and fell into disuse first. A sign here points to Thames Lock (3 miles), Guildford and Godalming (12 miles) and Greywell Tunnel (31 miles via the Basingstoke Canal).
The M25 and the Wey Navigation near New Haw
Immediately after its junction with the canal, the Navigation passes under a bridge that carries the main London to Southampton railway line (1838).  The railways of course were a further development and largely responsible for supplanting the canals as the principal means of goods transport.
Railway in Surrey
Railway in Surrey
Then there’s the motorway, the next stage in the development of transport.  An iron footbridge next to the railway bridge adds a further layer, albeit rather older and more environmentally sound!
railway in surrey
I have had a few funny looks from people during my visits here, and on a couple of occasions people have stopped to ask me what on earth I am photographing.  Yet, rather amusingly, I am clearly not the first photog to see potential in this location, although I don’t think I would ever go to such lengths to advertise my Flickr photo stream!

railway Surrey

Some people will do anything to get people to look at their photos

In some of my shots I have tried for a desaturated, moody look, to suit the industrial feel of the place.
Railway in Surrey
But sometimes I just can’t resist going for colour.  When the late afternoon sun peeps under the motorway, it almost looks pretty.
Railway in Surrey
The next shot does not properly belong here as I took it at Weybridge Station, while waiting to meet my daughter.  But it was taken on the same afternoon as some of the earlier pictures, just a few minutes later, and it has got a train in it…
Weybridge Train Station
Of all the photographs I have taken here so far, strangely my favourite has no train.  I like the simplicity of the brick bridge against the sky. It seemed to demand a contrasty black and white conversion.

Black and white railway bridge

ISO 50, 16mm, f/16, 11″
ND .6 Hard Grad, Circ. Polariser, .9 Pro-glass

Messing about in boats

Weybridge
Still on an Autumn tack, I thought I’d share some seasonal shots of the different craft that can be found along the Wey Navigation in Weybridge.
Wey Navigation
Situated on the confluence of the Thames and the Wey, and with the Wey Navigation running through it as well, Weybridge has a lot of watercraft, of all shapes and sizes.
Wey Navigation
I am mostly content to admire them from the towpath, however.
WeybridgeOf course, there could only ever be one quotation for this post:

Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing – absolutely nothing – half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.
– Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (1908)