Dungeness, finally

Dungeness, Kent

16mm, f/11, 1/6, ISo 100, .9 soft grad.

Having holidayed in the mountains this year, I have been feeling in need of a coast ‘fix’.  So, on Thursday, Jen and I made an evening dash south. We chose Dungeness, honeypot location for landscape photographers.  Having lived in the south of England for most of my life, I am not sure how I managed never to go to Dungeness before!

hut detail

102mm, f/7.1, 1.6″, ISO 400

The forecast predicted changeable weather and dramatic skies so we had high expectations. We should have known better. There was a small amount of texture in the sky on our arrival and the promise of some lightning, but in the end the rain washed in and the sky smoothed over.

dungeness

200mm, f/8, 0.8″, ISO 400

I took all the usual shots anyway.  The scene below is particularly oft-captured, as I know only too well from my evenings judging at camera clubs.  But, hey, I’d never been there before!  Had to take The Shot.  Would have been rude not to.

dungeness

58mm, f/11, 2″, ISO 100

When the sky gets boring, the long lens comes out for some detail work.  Dungeness certainly offers lots of potential there.  It’s not my usual style but I enjoyed capturing some images of the netting against the hut.

dungeness

200mm, f/11, 1.6″, ISO 400

I am thinking these two might make a nice diptych.

200mm, f/11, 5", ISO 100

200mm, f/11, 5″, ISO 100

I liked the texture of the partially burnt hut wall.

dungeness

200mm, f/7.1, 3.2″, ISO 400

I can finally see what everyone else has known for ages: Dungeness is cool – weird, but definitely cool.  I will be back.

dungeness

blend of 5 exposures, 200mm, f/2.8, 1/4, ISO 800

Mountain weather

Canadian landscape Last month we were in the Canadian Rockies, one of my very favourite places.   While we were in Banff we had changeable weather.  This was great news for the locals as it helped fight several serious wildfires. It was also great news for me for a less serious reason, as it added drama to my photos. Canadian landscapeThey say that if you don’t like the weather in the Rockies you only need wait 15 minutes and it will have changed.  Makes sense to me.

Three from Thurne

Norfolk

During my trip to Norfolk last month, I had the chance to spend a large part of one day at Thurne wind pump.  I took many of the usual, landscape type shots but I also enjoyed the chance to use my long lens and capture some graphic black and white details.

Norfolk

My photographic eye tends to veer automatically to the large vistas but I want to start catching more intimate aspects of the landscapes I visit too.  It’s a new project for 2015.

Norfolk

Do you think your eye tends to favour one sort of composition to the detriment of others and is there another you’d particularly like to master too?

Weather repeats itself

Send water meadows

365/28

Today we have had dramatic skies, glancing light and scattered showers, the sort of changeable weather that landscape photographers love. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to go out and capture it. But, on this day last year, we had exactly the same weather, and I was lucky enough to be out in it then. Here are three pictures from that very enjoyable day out in the water meadows and on the Wey Navigation towpath near Send, Surrey.

Surrey landscape

365/28

Surrey landscape

365/28

My 365/27 is also in black and white, a picture of the orchard at RHS Wisley, taken on an unusually sunny 27th January 2009.

RHS wisley

365/27

Deer in frost

wey navigation

Another picture from Friday’s fantastic, frosty day out.  As I was taking a landscape shot,  two deer took flight across the meadow.  Of course, my wide lens hadn’t a hope of catching them, but I quickly changed to my 70-200mm lens and hoped I’d find more.  Luckily, I did.

wey navigation

Yesterday, I shared the colour version of this shot, also from Friday but I rather like this tinted black and white edit too.   And it is a handy segue from frost to black and white to my 365/25, from this day in 2009:

car

365/25

 

Newark Priory

Surrey landmark

365/18

I spent this afternoon teaching a student on the Wey Navigation towpath near Newark Priory. Imagine my surprise when I got home and started to look for today’s 365 redux image to find that on 18th January 2009 I was at exactly the same place! The Priory was founded in the 12th century by Augustinian Canons, also known as ‘Black Canons’ because of their black cloaks and cassocks. At one point, the prosperous Priory housed a community of 200.  Henry VIII had it sacked during the Dissolution of the Monasteries; according to one story, a cannon was placed on the hill above it to bombard the buildings.  It was subsequently plundered for its building materials and fell into ruin; all that is left now is part of the church. A Grade I Ancient Monument, the Priory was placed on the English Heritage Buildings at Risk register in 2007. I can’t offer an image of it from today as I do not make my own pictures when I am out with students. The original of this image (before the fancy editing) was featured as the cover of six local interest magazines in 2010.