About Rachael

Professional fine art photographer.

Autumn and transition

Autumn is a season of transition and, this year, that has held true for me both professionally and personally. In August, my youngest child came back from a 5-week summer school at Berklee College of Music in Boston transformed into an independent young lady.  I see an empty nest yawning, especially as she wants to study in Boston when she’s 18.  It will be a challenge for me; we’re very close and she hasn’t given me any of the teenage trouble that might make one welcome a respite. Thank goodness there’s an opportunity here too and I’ve seized the extra time now available to further my photography business. I do feel very lucky at this stage of my life (not exactly Autumn yet, but certainly late Summer), when friends are starting to talk about retirement plans, to feel as though I am embarking on something new.

proud

Storm Brian, in October, showed me that my Sirens portfolio was not finished.

Autumn and Spring are my ‘workshops seasons’ and, this Autumn, I’ve run more workshops than ever, including two new ones. I’m just back from my inaugural Creative Abstracts and Details workshops. Two very enthusiastic groups enjoyed breaking photographic ‘rules’ as they explored their creativity at the coast. Driving home last night, and musing on the transitional nature of things generally, I felt energised by the willingness of both groups to embrace experimentation and risk-taking in their photography. In fact, it’s a trend I’ve noticed across all my workshops this Autumn. There’s been a lot of talk this year about repetition and sameness in landscape photography but among my clients I’d say, if anything, the opposite is true. Reviewing the morning’s images over lunch on both days, I was struck by how very individual each photographer’s interpretations were. I hope this trend, if it is a trend, continues. It’s so refreshing.

Sea Impression VIII

A painterly wave top captured at one of the locations of my Creative Abstracts and Details workshop, but not while leading!

There are three more workshops next week and then a break until the new year but that time will fill up fast as print orders are increasing in the run up to the festive season. It doesn’t hurt print sales that one of my photographs, Perigee, was printed in the Sunday Times Magazine again last month in connection with the Landscape Photographer of the Year competition. Perigee is the titular image in a series of abstract rust details. It’s certainly a change from my Sirens, and a much warmer palette, as you’d expect with rust! I’m enjoying printing Perigee on Platinum Etching paper, a lovely matte, textured paper with a warm base manufactured by Fotospeed.

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Hot off the printer, Perigee triptych.

Another big development this Autumn was the announcement that I am starting to lead residential photography workshops for Ocean Capture. I want my existing business, f11 Workshops, to stay true to its successful day-workshops format so it makes sense to run the residential workshops under the banner of Ocean Capture. It’s a very successful international business run by well-known, fine art, ocean photographer, Jonathan Chritchley and an obvious fit with my photography. I’ve never been very good at having a ‘boss’, so it’s important to be working with someone I can trust to let me run my workshops my way. I’ve known Jonathan for several years and when he invited me to join Ocean Capture, it wasn’t a difficult decision. My first Ocean Capture workshops, called ‘Tides and Tempests’, will run in March and November 2018, in Sussex, and availability is already down to last places. Plans are afoot for more far-flung locations, but it’s too soon to say anything more about those, for now…

Imogen and the lighthouse

Fingers crossed for weather like this on my Tides and Tempests workshops.

As I write this, I’m looking forward to the opening night of the Landscape Photographer of the Year exhibition at Waterloo, on Monday 20th November. I’m lucky enough to be receiving an award again this year and I’m really pleased that several of my friends will be there celebrating their own successes too. The exhibition will run into early February on the mezzanine level inside the station. It’s free and well worth visiting. It seems fitting to me that my photograph, Fire Within, winner of the Classic View category, the Lee Filters Prize and two judges’ commendations, was taken at one of my closest and favourite beaches, Birling Gap. The rapidly eroding chalk-cliff coast of East Sussex is about as transitional as you can get and access to the beach at Birling Gap has been closed for the last 6 weeks while the steps are moved back.  The beach reopens next month, just when I am on a break from workshops, so I know where I’m going to be hanging out with my camera in December. If you’re down there and see a rather wind-blown ‘tog’ in a funny hat, do come over and say hello.

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Fire Within, drama at Birling Gap.

 

“But when fall comes, kicking summer out on its treacherous ass as it always does one day sometime after the midpoint of September, it stays awhile like an old friend that you have missed. It settles in the way an old friend will settle into your favorite chair and take out his pipe and light it and then fill the afternoon with stories of places he has been and things he has done since last he saw you.”
― Stephen King, ‘Salem’s Lot

 

The new season begins

September heralds the start of the busiest season at f11 Workshops and, this Autumn, I’m running more workshops than ever before. So, yesterday being the first of the month, it seemed like a good day to head down to the coast to check on the locations for the first workshop. Places can change, even in a few months, and pre-workshop recces are one of the hidden but essential expenses of this business. 

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Well, it’s never exactly a chore to spend time at the coast and I also felt obliged to check that standards hadn’t fallen at various essential eateries, so I can’t complain! My son had lost a bet with me and I called in my marker, so he became my ‘photo-slave’ for the day, providing kit-carrying services and witty banter in equal measure.

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I don’t usually bring my camera when leading workshops as I prefer to concentrate on the clients rather than making my own images but, of course, this doesn’t apply to recces and, once all the essential business stuff had been taken care of, I had half an hour before last light. Luck was with me and the evening turned out nice, reminding me why I bring clients to this beautiful place.

Littlehampton evening 4

All is ready for my busiest workshops season yet – bring it on!

Helicopters without doors – the only way to fly

Let’s face it, helicopters are cool. They have to be one of the most exciting machines invented. The best bit of a helicopter flight? That moment immediately after lift off when the helicopter tilts in a way that no other aircraft can. Magic.

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I love simply riding in helicopters but it’s better if I can have my camera in my hand and, if I can have the doors off, better still. I’ve done a few doors-off shoots now and take the opportunity whenever I can. Only the cost stops me from doing more.  I love the perspective of looking straight down. Photographically, it’s achievable quite easily these days with a drone but I prefer the immediacy and connection of actually being up there myself. Besides which, in case I forgot to mention it, helicopters are cool.

Eagle I

So, it was a no-brainer during our recent trip to the USA that Pete and I should have at least one flight. In the end, we had two because it turns out helicopter flights are a lot cheaper there! First, we flew with Tuckermore Aviation over Boston Harbour. This is a regular sightseeing service over a set route. You get to fly over the city plus a couple of lovely lighthouses. The evening light we’d had for the rest of our week in Boston didn’t materialise but it was still loads of fun. Recommended.

Boston lighthouse

Moving on to Oregon, I’d arranged to charter a helicopter with Apex Helicopters out of Florence. As this was a private charter, Pete and I had the helicopter to ourselves for an hour. With my business hat on, I wanted to shoot the coast but, as a tourist, I was also hoping to see some grey whales. The best chance of seeing whales in Oregon is during migration which is long over by July but there are a few resident grey whales along the coast all year and we’d actually seen them from the shore almost every day, without even trying, so I had high hopes.

Kite surfer

Our pilot, Byron, was very experienced (a definite plus). He’d just come back from helping fight forest fires (very cool). Unfortunately, the only time he could do was at 5pm, rather early for the golden light I’d have preferred, but we went for it anyway.  I knew I wouldn’t find the colourful deltas photographed by others over locations like Iceland and Australia so I concentrated on capturing waves breaking on the shore and texture in the sand.

Byron was a great pilot and, if I get my way and we go back to Oregon, I’ll be calling him again.

Aerial Oregon I

Oh, and we did see whales.

whale IIGrey whale

No pictures please, this is Iceland

I spent 4 weeks of the last year in Iceland. I love it there. That’s hardly surprising for a photographer who shoots the coast – Iceland’s coast is … well … no superlative is adequate. But it’s so very much photographed. And there lies a potential problem. I find it hard to dim in my mind’s eye the beautiful images of others. Chips of ice on black sand – done, and done, and done. Mini icebergs floating in still water on the edge of a glacier… also done. Aerial views of colourful deltas that look like the most beautiful abstract art – so very done. Moody, misty receding mountains – well, you can guess what comes next. So, it’s not surprising that relatively few images from my trips to Iceland, so far, have made it to my website. Still, I’ll go back, probably more than once, even if I bring home no keepers at all, and here’s why.

In September, I spent a week in the WestFjords area. It’s relatively quiet, compared with the south coast, and we rarely encountered other photographers. But it’s also a frustrating place because, while the coast is stunning, and there’s lots of it with all those inlets, it’s hard to find anywhere to pull over. Time and time again we drove through the most incredible scenery without being able to stop. There was this one drive, however, along the shore towards Patreksfjord, that has stayed with me.  It was pouring with rain and there was nowhere to pull over on our sliver of road, sandwiched between mountain and ocean. But I was listening to some great tunes and looking out of the window at mountains soaring straight from the sea, shore grass billowing in the wind and foam-topped waves silvering the curves of the strand. It was an ineffably wild place, so very different from anywhere closer to home. Uncompromising and uncompromised. Then, as we swung round a corner, something magical happened; a hawk shot out of nowhere, no doubt surprised by our van, and sailed above us before melting into the mist. An ordinary enough thing, I suppose, but that moment has lodged itself in my mind’s eye.  When we got to our motel and my companions sensibly had a rest before dinner, I walked along the shore for an hour in the pouring rain. I had to – I didn’t want the magic to end. I made no photographs at that place, not one. But it has informed every picture I’ve made since, in Iceland or closer to home.

So this is why I travel. I often say that the secret to making strong images lies in shooting close to home, in going to places to which we can return, again and again. We relax in the knowledge that we’ll be back and this means we’re not afraid to spend time taking risks, trying new compositions that might not work at all. We can move on from the obvious and seek difference, the things that mean something to us as individuals. That’s what art should communicate, in my opinion. But that doesn’t mean I dismiss the value of travel. Far from it. I will continue to travel, even if my hit rate of images is lower than when I’m at home. I will continue to do it, with enthusiasm, as often as I can afford. For moments like this.

Time spent developing our own connection with the landscape, on nurturing that spark inside us that makes us want to make beautiful photographs, is just as valuable as time spent actually making them. I think it’s fair to say that most landscape photographers do it because they love the landscape; there’s not enough money in it these days to make it a pragmatic career choice. Time spent feeding that love is time well spent. Put most simply, that fleeting encounter with a wild thing on a dismal day in Iceland made me happy.

Worth it.

fairy falls

Not a picture from the journey in this blog, because I didn’t make one (that’s the point), but Iceland nonetheless.

Not a retrospective

It has become customary for photographers to do a year-end retrospective of their images and plaudits but I thought I might try something different. I’d like, instead, to introduce other photographers and artists whose work I have enjoyed this year and who have inspired me. I am a voracious consumer of visual art as I think it profoundly influences and improves my own work as well as being a very nice way to spend time. In no particular order, here are a few of my favourites from 2016.

Brian Kosoff

I was first introduced to this photographer’s portfolio at the end of last year and I’ve been back many times since. I am a fan of the cinematic crop and I think his beautifully composed black and white images are powerfully resonant.

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Valda Bailey

I bought a copy of Valda’s book, Fragile, earlier this year and it’s fast become one of my favourites. Her style couldn’t be more different from my own but I really enjoy the gentle, ethereal nature of the images she has collected in this book.

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Kozu Books

I have a bit of a photo book habit. I don’t try to control it. This year I’ve been indulging in a collection of small-but-beautifully-formed books from Kozu Books called Landscape Editions. It began with a beautiful book featuring the work of long-time-favourite, David Baker and, since then, I’ve bought every one. Last week, the latest three dropped onto my doormat, two lovely collections of forest imagery by Lee Acaster and Damian Ward and an arrestingly fine collection of black and white images by Matt Botwood. I like it that each book comes with a print that I can add to the inspiration wall in my studio.

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Susan Burnstine

More black and white, but it’s so good! Burnstine’s moody, grungy, square photographs of New York almost seem to vibrate with quiet power. Just me, perhaps, but do have a look – worth it.

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Jonathan Chritchley

I have benefitted enormously from Jonathan’s advice this year. He’s probably best known in the UK for his photography holidays, which are some of the most well-organised around. An inveterate globe-trotter and a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, Jonathan is an accomplished fine art photographer. If you like well-crafted, black and white, mostly-square photographs, click through to his website – you won’t be sorry.

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Maggi Hambling

I was introduced to Hambling’s sea-paintings this Autumn during a trip to Suffolk and bought a copy of her book, The Sea (there’s that book habit again). Abstract and strangely unsettling at times, her paintings have inspired me to continue developing my wave photography. I’m not going to say any more about that, for now…

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Outdoor Photography magazine

My favourite photography magazine and the only one to which I subscribe. It’s a nice mix of imagery, news, technical and artistic information and thought-provoking opinions.

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That’s it. There are lots more I could mention but then this blog would be too long and no-one would read it! In the meantime, if you wanted to add in the comments below a photographer, publication or something else that has inspired you this year, I’d be delighted.

Waves and more waves

This year continues to be all about waves. I am delighted to have won the Sunday Times Magazine’s award in Landscape Photographer of the Year 2016 with my image, Maelstrom, taken during Storm Imogen in February.

maelstrom

Maelstrom

I had 5 images shortlisted so I knew I was in with a chance of getting one into the book but the congratulatory email on Friday came as something of a surprise, a rather nice surprise. Yesterday was slightly surreal as Maelstrom occupied a double-page spread in the magazine but I wasn’t allowed to share the news myself until the official results were out this morning. I can now also share that I received a Highly Commended award and a judge’s choice for another Storm Imogen photo, Poseidon Rising, and a Commended award for a third, Leviathan.

Poseidon rising

Poseidon Rising

All three images will be in the LPotY Portfolio 10 book, on sale from today, and Maelstrom will also feature in an exhibition at London Waterloo from 21st November.

leviathan

Leviathan

You can see many of the other successful images here.  Many, many thanks to the Sunday Times Magazine for choosing my picture.

Yachts from the Air

Round the Island-7
Earlier this month, the annual Round the Island yacht race took place. 1,533 boats set off from Cowes to circumnavigate the Isle of Wight.
Round the Island again again
It’s a spectacular sight, literally a sea of sails. Rather excitingly, I had the opportunity to shoot the race from the air, from a helicopter owned by  Phoenix Helicopters, Goodwood.
Round the Island-4
It wasn’t my first time shooting from a helicopter without doors so I wasn’t phased when we took off and headed out over the Solent. I love flying in helicopters!
Round the Island-5
Phoenix had obtained a low fly permit for me so we were able to fly fairly close to the yachts, although there are of course limits and I was glad to have my 70-200mm zoom with me.
Round the Island-2
Using two cameras, the other one with my 24-70mm lens, enabled me to capture wider views as well.
Round the Island-9
I had particularly wanted to photograph the yachts rounding The Needles, arguably the Island’s most iconic landmark and certainly one that looms large in my memories from a childhood spent sailing the Solent.

In addition to the big ‘race’ shots, I hoped to capture some closer pictures that would work in black and white for a more timeless feel.

Round the Island-11

In addition to all the many yachts on the sea, the RNLI lifeboats were kept busy attending to boats struggling in the challenging conditions on the day.

Round the Island again-4

It was an exhilarating experience, and one I hope to repeat. Many thanks to Max from Phoenix for his excellent piloting.

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Round the Island-12