Textures of Lyme

Lyme Regis
Lyme Regis, on Dorset’s Jurassic Coast, is one of my favourite towns. One morning in August last year I left my family enjoying the sandy beach and went hunting for images. I have shared some of my larger compositions in earlier posts, but I also snapped up some details, trying to capture some of the textures of the harbour.

Lyme Regis

Can you see a face?


The distinctive S shape of Lyme’s famous seawall, The Cobb, has become a symbol for the town.
Lyme Regis
The harbour is used by pleasure boats and fishing boats, and there are plenty of interesting textures in the paraphernalia of the trade.
Lyme Regis
Old wooden hulls contrast with modern plastic fenders.
Lyme Regis
Colours of rust show up against black doors.
rusty locks
There are plenty of interesting signs as well, some with a sense of humour.
Lyme Regis
This last shot is more about people than textures, although I suppose the town’s people are part of its texture on a larger scale. Appropriate to its strong maritime flavour, Lyme Regis has a Boat Building Academy. I snapped some youngsters taking a break from their craft.
Lyme Regis
More from Lyme another day.

St. Peter Port

GuernseySt. Peter Port is the principal town on Guernsey, one of the Channel Islands.

Guernsey

Castle Cornet

It is a delightful little place.
Guernsey

One of the town’s squares

Cobbled lanes reveal boutiques and galleries, as well as the more usual high street shopping.
Guernsey

The high street

Cafes and Brasseries spill out onto pedestrianised alleys.
Guernsey

Cafe society

There’s even a spot to rest your feet and have a good read.
Guernsey

A reader’s haven

The picturesque harbour is guarded by the imposing hulk of Castle Cornet, which is reflected in the still water of a Victorian boating pond.
Guernsey

Castle cornet reflected in Victorian boating pond

The Castle is well worth a visit, and I will do a post about it soon. But the town itself demands equal attention, a delightful place to hang out for a lazy day or two of meandering exploration. We will be back.
Guernsey

Helicopter views

London helicopter tour

Our aircraft arrives

Last year I bought my husband a helicopter flight with The London Helicopter. We finally got around to booking it earlier this summer.

London

Westminster

I love helicopter flights. I love the change of point of view and the crazy angles you don’t get from an aircraft.

London

The City

Photography is challenging. Windows are not where you want them and never clean enough; viewpoints disappear before you have time to frame them; and then there’s those pesky reflections.

London

Battersea

It doesn’t stop me trying though.

London

Millenium Dome

We were blessed with a clear afternoon, luckily. It was so much fun seeing parts of London we know well from a whole new perspective.

London

Docklands

This was not my first helicopter sightseeing experience. We have taken a ‘copter over the Grand Canyon.

Aerial view

Can you see the other ‘copter below?

We have also enjoyed a flight over Kauai’s spectacular Na Pali coast.

Hawaii

A scene out of Jurassic Park

And, perhaps most spectacular of all, a flight over Volcanoes National Park on Hawaii’s Big Island.

volcano

Lava meets the Pacific

I kept the crazy angle in the next shot, to show that it was taken from a helicopter.

Hawaii

Lava + ocean = steam, and lots of it.

I was much happier seeing this from a helicopter than on foot!

Hawaii

Lava travelling underground vents through ‘skylights’ in the crust.

I would love to do a ‘doors-off’ flight next. I think I am hooked.

Hawaii volcano

Infernal Eye

La Coupée

Sark
Our trip to the Channel Islands this summer included a stay on Sark.
Sark
Under the effects of wind and water, Sark is becoming two islands, Great and Little Sark. They are joined by a narrow isthmus called La Coupée.
Sark
It’s a spectacular spot, the cliffs shearing off steeply from both sides of the narrow path. My photos don’t really do it justice.
Sark
La Coupée used to be so dangerous that people would crawl over it on their hands and knees. During the nineteenth century, the path eroded until it was only three feet wide. The present road dates from 1945 and was constructed by German prisoners of war. It can still be an eventful crossing even today; on busy days tourists pushing bikes, the principal means of transport on this car-free island, mingle with carts pulled by horses. The latter have right of way, but there’s not a lot of room when they pass! Sadly, I didn’t get a shot of a cart on La Coupée; I always seemed to be there at the wrong time.
Sark
I did, however, manage to take some photos of La Coupée at dusk. As the light dims, and the people leave, it becomes a spooky place and, not surprisingly, has had a reputation for being haunted. One story tells of a black dog, called the Tchico, who roams the cliffs around La Coupée at night. I didn’t see Tchico, which is probably just as well.
Sark
More about Sark next week.

Venetian Ghetto

Venetian ghetto
This image was captured in the Ghetto of Venice, an sequestered spot within the city that allows the visitor to escape the crowds thronging the main pathways and alleys. It is an atmospheric place and, of course, has an interesting history, which I will soon explore in another post. Until then, I leave you with Shylock’s famous speech from The Merchant of Venice:

Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs,
dimensions, senses, affections, passions; fed with
the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject
to the same diseases, heal’d by the same means,
warm’d and cool’d by the same winter and summer
as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed?
If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us,
do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?

William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act III, scene i.