Rhubarb, Celery and Pomegranate

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What a lot of fun I have had today photographing fruit on my lightbox.  I liked the colours of this particular combination of healthy food.
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My little A4 lightbox was a nice investment.  I think it set me back £50 but it has repaid every penny.
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I love the curliness of rhubarb and celery strings.
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And the rhubarb’s bold, graphic stripes.
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And best of all, the fridge is now full of delicious fruit for endless weekend snacking.  More foody madness tomorrow.

By torchlight

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When I first started digital photography I spent quite a lot of time playing around with torchlight and reflections in my kitchen worktop. It was a great way to learn about my camera.

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Making do with props from around the home was fun. My son’s school lever arch files made handy backdrops. In the next shot, I suspended the leaves from the extractor hood using blu-tack and cotton thread.

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I find that using a handheld torch stimulates creativity. In the final shot, the subject is a shell, its ridges illuminated by a torch. I like the way the eye is fooled into not being sure whether the spiral moves away from or towards it.

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Do you have any favourite home studio techniques?

The pleasure in making do

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Photographers can spend a great deal of money on equipment, especially if they want to shoot indoors, studio-style. This image is one of my most successful. It has won me several awards and has been accepted into juried exhibitions. Recently it was one of only seven images from Surrey accepted into the Photographic Alliance of Great Britain’s annual projected digital image exhibition. Judges often comment favourably on the fine control of lighting in this photograph. Yet this shot was taken in natural daylight in front of a black lever arch file with a piece of white paper as a reflector. I used my canon 400D and its kit lens, now considered by most to be outdated and barely adequate equipment. The tripod is more than fifty years old and was passed on to me by my father. A picture of my totally Heath Robinson setup (and very messy kitchen) is below. Who needs a posh studio? There is pleasure in making do.

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