Photo essays and projects

seascape

4″, f/11, 35mm, ISO 200, Big Stopper and circ. polariser

The internet has, mostly, been a marvellous thing for enthusiast photographers, not least because images are readily available for our viewing and educational pleasure.  Although there is still nothing quite like seeing an image in print, we no longer need to buy a magazine or go to an exhibition for our daily dose of photo inspiration.

Wreck on Bognor beach

1.6″, f/7.1, 70mm, ISO 200, Big Stopper and circ. polariser.

As most of us have realised, however, volume does not equal quality and discernment is a skill we must develop to become better photographers.  One of the difficulties in our way is that fact that most photosharing sites, like Flickr and 500px, reward the high-impact, stand-alone image.  Often, subtler images, that reward a more lingering gaze, are overlooked in the frenetic world of internet attention spans.

Groynes on Bognor beach

2″, f/8, 70mm. ISO 200, Big Stopper and circ. polariser.

Recently, I have found myself enjoying Adobe’s image-sharing site, Behance, not only because overall the standard of imagery is high, but because Behance is geared towards projects rather than stand-alone images.  This is where the professionals hang out and, perhaps because they tend to be working on commissioned projects, the site abounds in sequences of images, connected visually and creatively into cohesive wholes. If you have not yet found Behance, I recommend a visit.  Just select photography from the ‘creative fields’ drop down menu and soak up the gorgeousness.

West Sussex seascape

20″, f/11, 70mm, ISO 50, Big Stopper and circ. polariser.

Inspired by what I have been seeing there, I have started to make sets of images, linked by style, subject or even colour.  The five images posted here were all taken on the same day last week when I had to be in West Sussex.  The weather was stormy, with sudden bursts of bright sunlight in front of heavy skies, so I decided to exploit that changeable feeling, deliberately using a variety of shutter speeds to capture the sea’s mood.  By afternoon, the weather had eased but I attempted to carry the morning’s colour palette into the afternoon’s shoot, at Selsey Lifeboat station.

West Sussex seascape

1/60, f/11, 16mm, ISO 50, Big Stopper and circ. polariser.

Incidentally, the second image is of a wrecked portion of WW2 mulberry harbour that has been rusting away on Aldwick beach for seventy years.  Believe it or not, I grew up literally a stone’s throw from this wreck but have only now bothered to photograph it.  Sometimes we overlook the things closest to us.

Friday afternoon in the city

London street

Muffling up for the journey home


Yesterday, I popped up to London to capture a few moments in the end-of-week commute.

London street

No room on the bus


I enjoy street photography, although I am still very much a newbie at it.

London Street

Messages for the messenger


Street seems to suit a grittier style than my more usual genres. I still find myself tempted to tweak and beautify. I find it difficult to shake off the need to have detail in the highlights and the darks, which means my street shots often lack the striking contrasts seen in the work of established street photographers, like Christophe Agou.

London street

The evening headline


Some of my favourite street images by other photographers work as sets or photo essays rather than as stand alone images. There is definitely a different art to the photo essay, and it’s one I’d like to learn. The images I made yesterday hardly count against the work of the great, but it’s a start.

London street

Welcome to the weekend


For a superb collection of street images, see the work of Christophe Agou. I particularly like his Life Below series.

London street

The lost weekend