Painshill revisited

Cobham, Surrey

f/11, 2.5″, 16mm, ISO 50

This day last year, I was at Painshill Park, in Cobham, Surrey, a restored eighteenth century landscape garden.

Painshill Park, Cobham

f/5, 1/40, 35mm, ISO 400

One of Painshill’s famous follies, the Gothic Temple, is seen above, reflected in one of the arches of the bridge. Below, another folly, the Ruined Abbey is situated picturesquely on the bank of the lake.

Cobham, Surrey

f/10, 1/250, 33mm, ISO 200

The image below is the only one I shared at the time.  Another folly appears with the Gothic Temple, the Chinese Bridge.

Cobham, Surrey

f/11, 2.5″, 16mm, ISO 50

Painshill’s working vineyard produces a nice sparkling white.

Cobham, Surrey

f/11, 0.3″, 16mm, ISO 50

Seen below, the Turkish Tent is another of Painshill’s follies.

For the techies, I used a .6 ND hard grad for these shots, and a circular polariser, of course. I have written several other posts about this favourite location of mine. Just click on the tags, Painshill or Painshill Park to find them.

folly at Painshill Park

f/11, 2.5″, 28mm, ISO 50

A foggy day at Painshill

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Turkish tent and five arch bridge

As regular readers of this blog will know, one of my favourite local locations is Painshill Park, an eighteenth century landscape garden in Cobham. When I woke up one morning late last month to find a heavy fog, I took my trusty Fuji down to Painshill for a ramble.

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Gothic temple and five arch bridge

The mist had coated everything in the finest dew and the spiders’ webs were looking stunning against early Autumn foliage.

Autumn web

Autumn web

Every tuft of grass bore a sparkling hammock of silk.

landscape garden

Hammocks of gossamer and dew

Berries of every hue reminded me that, in the words of the immortal Keats, this was a season of mists and mellow fruitfulness.

berries and leaves

Red berries

Elderberries

Elderberries

Not to be outdone, fungi of all kinds were busy decorating the grass,

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A toadstool in the park

the forest floor,

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Toadstools in the wood

and every tree stump.

fungus

Bracken fungus (maybe)

Most of the trees had yet to start turning, but there were a few obliging maples dropping their pastel leaves prettily onto the banks of Painshill Lake, just to give me some foreground interest.

folly and autumn leaves

The ruined abbey

In the mist, everything was still. Even sound seemed to be muffled, and it felt as if I had the whole park to myself.

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Painshill Lake

The Grotto was closed but I explored the outside.

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View through the Grotto window

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Nature colonising the Grotto

I often think the Gothic Tower, one of Painshill’s many follies, is a little too pretty to be truly gothic, but in the mist it did look a little bit spooky. A very little bit.

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The Gothic Tower

In the woods, I came across these dens, no doubt made by parties of children. Blair Witch, anyone?

landcape garden

‘Mysterious’ dens

They were not far from The Hermitage, one of my favourite follies.

landscape garden

The Hermitage

For a while in the eighteenth century, every self-repecting landscape garden had to have a hermit. Painshill was no exception although story has it that the first man hired for the job lasted only two weeks before he was discovered in a local hostelry drowning his sorrows! He was never replaced.

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Inside the Hermitage

Every time I go to Painshill I find something new, whether it be one of nature’s works of art or a fragment of the craft of people.

stone carving

A fragment of times past

I made a mental note to go back again later this month to see the Park in its full Autumn glory.

Painshill Park

The Chinese Bridge

Another of my posts about Painshill, including some of its history, is here.

Still Autumn, just…

Painshill Park, Surrey

Today the leaves have begun to fall in earnest.  Flurries billow under the wheels of passing vehicles and the windscreens of parked cars are patterned with a tapestry of gold and orange.   Although the season is nearly over,  I thought I might share some more Autumn shots, taken during my recent visit to Painshill Park in Cobham, Surrey.

Painshill Park

The Mausoleum

Painshill Park

The Gothic Temple

Painshill Park

Autumn foliage

Painshill Parkm

Harvestman

Painshill Park

Coot on golden pond

Painshill Park

Painshill Lake

For an earlier post where I talk about some of the history of Painshill and share some more images, see here.

An Autumn garden

landscape garden
Sheffield Park is an eighteenth century landscape garden in East Sussex owned by the National Trust.
landscape garden
Sheffield (meaning sheep clearing) Park is mentioned in the Doomsday Book. The garden was landscaped first by Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown and then Humphrey Repton.
landscape garden
In the nineteenth century planting for an arboretum was begun. Arthur Soames purchased the estate in 1910 and continued the massive planting programme, much of which still exists today, and is particularly regarded for its Autumn colour.
Sheffield Park landscape garden
We were a little early for the best leaves but there was still plenty of colour. If you live anywhere within striking distance of this beautiful garden, I recommend a visit. Just don’t forget your camera!

More Autumn colour tomorrow.